WEST AFRICA

WHY CLIMATE CHANGE IN AFRICA IS SO IMPORTANT TO US

Climate change affects us all, but for those living in already poverty-stricken communities, these effects are even more brutal. The most vulnerable are also, unfortunately, the hardest hit, and without proper resources, finances, and training, they have little hope of survival as the effects of climate change worsen with each passing year. Climate change knows no boundaries, and due to the interconnectedness of the ecosystem, the effects of pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, and drought from one country impact every country. As a global society, it is, therefore, necessary for all of us to address climate change and implement ways to mitigate the impacts of global warming activities.

Climate change initiatives in Africa are few and far between for numerous reasons. Most of the African countries that submitted plans in Paris rely on partial or complete international funding. As climate finance has been slow, it is becoming increasingly unrealistic for Africa to deliver their climate plans. 

Many of their big cities are plagued with poverty, bad infrastructure, overpopulation, conflict, and dysfunctional governance.  These challenges become nearly insurmountable as they try to implement and build from scratch a stable green energy system that will further their capacity to achieve the goals of lowering their carbon output. However, the Paris Agreement does provide an opportunity to accelerate socio-economic growth and develop a policy framework and operational paths to sustainable development if the international community properly supports them. Knowing this, we at ERI have been actively working to mitigate the effects of climate change through our many programs worldwide.

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Cocody, Ivory Coast

Eco-City Initiative for Cocody

In cooperation with the Government of Côte d'Ivoire, ERI's Professor Toure (head of ERI West Africa's office) is working directly with the City of Cocody and its Mayor, Mr. N'GOAN Aka Mathias, to create the first West African eco-city. This city will be fueled by clean green energy and use carbon sequestration projects to reduce CO2 emissions by 28% by 2030.

To achieve this objective (which is an integral part of the strategic plans and priority objectives of the Ivorian Government), the United Nations and the African Union - in tandem with ERI - are targeting the City of Cocody in Abijdan to be the pilot city for building and implementing an Eco-City initiative, entitled "Cocody Cité Verte, Carbon well of Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire and Africa …." 

This pilot city will serve as a business plan and model for addressing climate change and sustainability, and will eventually convert all 13 municipalities in the District of Abidjan and other the cities of Côte d'Ivoire and West Africa into eco-cities.

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Carbon Sequestration - One of Many Tools in ERI's Climate Change Programs

Climate Change Initiative for Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso, Niger and Mali

Since 2009, Earth Rights Institute's West Africa Office, under the direction of Professor Dramane Toure Nable, has been working on climate change projects to address the challenges faced in the northern region of the Ivory Coast as well in Burkina Faso, Niger, and Mali. As part of the Climate Change Initiative for Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso, Niger and Mali (which all 4 nations approved), we are introducing several projects specifically geared towards carbon sequestration. 

About Earth Rights Institute

The Earth is the birthright of all people

Earth Rights Institute (ERI) is designed to be an equilateral knowledge platform, where local people collaborate with academics and development professionals, both local and foreign, by exchanging skills, experiences, and knowledge to solve crucial development issues such as widespread poverty, land right disputes and environmental degradation.

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